Exercises, their parameters, and features
During a workout, you perform exercises. Each exercise characterized by parameters, like weight and reps, or time and distance, or time/reps only, and so on. Everything is quite transparent, but just in case, here are examples of parameters and exercises, which can be described by such parameters:

Weight & Reps: Barbell Squats, Machine Leg Extensions
Time & Distance: Running, Rowing
Reps only: Push Ups, Box Jumps, Crunches, Rope Climbs
Time only: Plank, Rope Jumping, 100 meter Run, Battle Ropes
Weight & Time: Farmers Holds, Weighted Plank
Weight & Distance: Farmers Walk, Sled
Reps & Time: Burpees, Tire Flipping

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Also, the exercise may have features that help calculate the correct metrics, such as training volume or one-rep max. If the exercise has such features, it affects the numbers that are entered in the parameter fields.

Weight x 2
Let's imagine that you've done a shoulder press - 10 reps with 50 lb dumbbells. The most common way to write it down is 50 lb x 10 reps, and we suggest using that way. To calculate correctly total weight lifted, we need to take into account that you were lifting 100 pounds in each rep. "Weight x 2" feature is used to indicate this.

Unilateral
Single-leg or single-arm movements, like Lunges or Single-Arm Dumbbell Rows.

Let's imagine that you've done a set of lunges - 12 reps for each leg with a 120 lb barbell. You can write it down as 120 lb x 12 or as 120 lb x 24. We suggest using the first way. To calculate correctly total weight lifted, we need to take into account that you made 24 movements, 12 on each leg. "Unilateral" feature is used to indicate this.

Bodyweight
Exercises that use near 100% of your weight to provide resistance against gravity, such as Pull-Ups, or Weighted Dips.

Let's imagine that you've done a set of pull-ups: 10 reps with additional weight (let it be a 16 kg kettlebell). To calculate correctly total weight lifted, we need to take into account that the main resistance was provided not by the kettlebell, but by your body. "Bodyweight" feature is used to indicate this.

For Time
This feature is used to indicate that the shortest time is the best.

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All these "correct calculations" mentioned above are used to build graphs. Depending on the parameters, these graphs can be of different types. For instance, for strength exercise that uses weight and reps as parameters, it is the one-rep max graph and the total weight lifted graph. For cardio exercise (time + distance), it is the pace, total time, and total distance graphs.

About 1RM. Under 8 reps we use the Brzycki formula and over 10 reps we use the Epley formula. Between 8 and 10 repetitions we use a linear interpolation of Brzycki and Epley so 9 repetitions is 50-50.

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